• Heavy Resistance Training for Older Males
    A natural part of aging is loss of muscle mass, or sarcopenia. Learn how this can be slowed with the right training program. From the NSCA's Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.
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  • Heavy resis training older males

    Read the full-length article in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

    Synopsis 

    Sarcopenia, defined as age-related loss of muscle mass, negatively affects strength, which subsequently decreases the ability to perform tasks of daily living. This has become a very large problem for many older individuals. A recent study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research examined if a short-term heavy resistance training program in healthy older men could eliminate deficits in muscle mass and strength (ST) compared with healthy younger men. 

    The results of this study found that short-term, heavy resistance training in healthy older men is sufficient to overcome deficits in muscle mass and strength when compared to healthy younger men. In this study, the older males trained three days per week for 3 sets of 10 repetitions to muscular fatigue with 2 min of rest between sets for each exercise (5 upper body, 4 lower body) at an intensity that corresponded with 70% 1RM for the leg press and bench press and a weight corresponding to their 10RM for other exercises. 

    The practical application from this research is that healthy older men can be prescribed a whole-body, heavy resistance training program to substantially increase muscle mass and strength to levels similar to younger active individuals.

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  • Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

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    NSCA Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

    The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research is the NSCA's scientific journal. This monthly publication prints original research information important to strength and conditioning practitioners. Many educational institutions, researchers, and professionals retain this journal as a valuable reference.

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