• Are Bodyweight Jump Squats Ideal for Power Output in Adolescent Male Athletes?
    The greatest potential for increasing power comes from training with a load that maximizes power. The jump squat is often used to develop lower body explosive power. However, the optimal load used to maximize gains in power output have varied from low (0–20% 1RM) to high (30–90% 1RM) in literature. A recent study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research investigated different loads affected maximal power output in the jump squat.
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    Adolescent Male AthleteRead the full-length article in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 

    The greatest potential for increasing power comes from training with a load that maximizes power. The jump squat is often used to develop lower body explosive power.  

    However, the optimal load used to maximize gains in power output have varied from low (0–20% 1RM) to high (30–90% 1RM) in literature.  

    A recent study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research investigated different loads affected maximal power output in the jump squat. 

    Each jump squat was performed on a force plate so that peak power could be calculated. The following jump squat loads were based off of each participant’s 1RM squat performance:   

    • Bodyweight (0%)  
    • 20% 
    • 40% 
    • 60% 
    • 80%   

    Bodyweight jump squats (0% 1RM) appear to be the optimal load for maximizing power output in both adolescent and college-aged males. It is important to also include strength training with heavy loads into a power training program to ensure that power output is increased similarly across the entire loading spectrum. 

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  • Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

    About the Author:

    NSCA Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

    The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research is the NSCA's scientific journal. This monthly publication prints original research information important to strength and conditioning practitioners. Many educational institutions, researchers, and professionals retain this journal as a valuable reference.

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  • Disclaimer: The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) encourages the exchange of diverse opinions. The ideas, comments, and materials presented herein do not necessarily reflect the NSCA’s official position on an issue. The NSCA assumes no responsibility for any statements made by authors, whether as fact, opinion, or otherwise. 
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